Quick Post

Operant or Classical Conditioning? What do you think?

New Topic
Operant or Classical Conditioning? What do you think?
  •  

    My dogs trainer gives a short test to all his new students before he starts a new class.  He wants everyone to have an understanding of what he is going to teach them and why their dogs repond as they do.   He asks a couple of quick questions to see who understands the difference between Operant and Classical Conditioning before he teaches any training.  It is interesting in the least, let's have fun and see how you answer.  

    Answer either Operant or Classical.  If you decide the behavior is operant, identify which type of consequence was responsible for the behavior change (i.e., positive/negative reinforcement; positive/negative punishment). 

    1.  Every time someone flushes a toilet in the apartment building, the shower becomes very hot and causes the person to jump back. Over time, the person begins to jump back automatically after hearing the flush, before the water temperature changes.

    2.  Your father gives you a credit card at the end of your first year in college because you did so well. As a result, your grades continue to get better in your second year.

    3.  Your car has a red, flashing light that blinks annoyingly if you start the car without buckling the seat belt. You become less likely to start the car without buckling the seat belt.

    4.  A lion in a circus learns to stand up on a chair and jump through a hoop to receive a food treat.

    5.  A professor has a policy of exempting students from the final exam if they maintain perfect attendance during the quarter. His students' attendance increases dramatically.

    6.  You check the coin return slot on a pay telephone and find a quarter. You find yourself checking other telephones over the next few days.

    7.  Your hands are cold so you put your gloves on. In the future, you are more likely to put gloves on when it's cold.

    8.  John Watson conducted an experiment with a boy named Albert in which he paired a white rat with a loud, startling noise. Albert now becomes startled at the sight of the white rat.

    9.  You eat a new food and then get sick because of the flu. However, you develop a dislike for the food and feel nauseated whenever you smell it.

    10.  An individual receives frequent injections of drugs, which are administered in a small examination room at a clinic. The drug itself causes increased heart rate but after several trips to the clinic, simply being in a small room causes an increased heart rate.

    ETA:  I will give the answers later.  I thought it would be more fun to give it a try first.

     

  • Your trainer... is he leading a class that you're in with other people and their dogs, or are you a trainer in training? If it's the former, Nicole Wilde says in her book "It's Not The Dogs, It's The People!" to speak in a very simplified manner so they don't get confused. She said to avoid scientific terms that might be confusing to the client.

    1. Classical, 2. Operant, 3. Classical, 4. Operant, 5. Operant, 6. Classical, 7. Classical, 8. Operant

    luvmyswissy

     

    My trainer gives a short test to all his new students.   He asks a couple of quick questions to see who understands the difference between Operant and Classical Conditioning before he teaches any training.  It is interesting in the least, let's have fun and see how you answer.  

  • Nope its my dog's trainer.  He does this so people understand better what there objectives are.    I will edit to be more clear.  Is it a good idea?  Everyone seem to really enjoy the test and the outcomes and a better understanding.  .

  • Awww.. well I don't really have a terribly thorough understanding of classical vs. operant conditioning, so I played for fun thinking the answers were gonna be given after the questions.

    Here's my answers.. no idea if they're correct or not.

    1. classical
    2. +R
    3. -R
    4. +R
    5. -P
    6. +R
    7. classical
    8. classical
    9. +P
    10. classical

  • luvmyswissy

    Nope its my dog's trainer.  He does this so people understand better what there objectives are.    I will edit to be more clear.  Is it a good idea?  Everyone seem to really enjoy the test and the outcomes and a better understanding.  .

    Oh I think it's a great idea, there's no doubt about that.  I'm just surprised your trainer has the time to go over this.  There's only so much you can do in an hour's class... especially to new students.  This would seem like something they'd teach in an advanced class. 

  • I'm scared. I haven't looked at the other answers. I'm going to give this a try on my own.

    1.  Classical

    2.  OC +R

    3.  OC -P

    4.  OC +R

    5.  OC -R

    6.  OC +R

    7.  OC -R

    8.  CC

    9.  CC

    10. CC


  • ShelterDogs

    luvmyswissy

    Nope its my dog's trainer.  He does this so people understand better what there objectives are.    I will edit to be more clear.  Is it a good idea?  Everyone seem to really enjoy the test and the outcomes and a better understanding.  .

    Oh I think it's a great idea, there's no doubt about that.  I'm just surprised your trainer has the time to go over this.  There's only so much you can do in an hour's class... especially to new students.  This would seem like something they'd teach in an advanced class. 

    I wouldn't exactly say he teaches it really.  He explains it and then he give the examples and goes over the answers.  However, the first class is without dogs and only people.  He covers the class, the training and reviews overall puppy behaviors, saftey, etc.     He dosen't hesitate to reveiw it at any level since it kinda his montra.  He'll remind people of motivators etc.

     

    PS:  I'll post the answers later for eveyone.


  • 1.  Every time someone flushes a toilet in the apartment building, the shower becomes very hot and causes the person to jump back. Over time, the person begins to jump back automatically after hearing the flush, before the water temperature changes.  Classical

    2.  Your father gives you a credit card at the end of your first year in college because you did so well. As a result, your grades continue to get better in your second year. Operant +R (increase in behavior of getting good grades because of something given to the subject)

    3.  Your car has a red, flashing light that blinks annoyingly if you start the car without buckling the seat belt. You become less likely to start the car without buckling the seat belt. Operant -R (increase of behavior of buckling seatbelt due to something unpleasant being removed from the subject)

    4.  A lion in a circus learns to stand up on a chair and jump through a hoop to receive a food treat. Operant +R (increase in behavior of jumping through hoop because of something given to the subject)

    5.  A professor has a policy of exempting students from the final exam if they maintain perfect attendance during the quarter. His students' attendance increases dramatically. Operant -R (increase in behavior of class attendance because of something removed from the subjects) or you could look at it as +P (decrease in behavior of class cutting by giving students who do it the exam)

    6.  You check the coin return slot on a pay telephone and find a quarter. You find yourself checking other telephones over the next few days. Operant +R (increase in behavior caused by something given to subject)

    7.  Your hands are cold so you put your gloves on. In the future, you are more likely to put gloves on when it's cold. Operant -R (increase in behavior of putting gloves on caused by removing something--the cold--from the subject)

    8.  John Watson conducted an experiment with a boy named Albert in which he paired a white rat with a loud, startling noise. Albert now becomes startled at the sight of the white rat. Classical

    9.  You eat a new food and then get sick because of the flu. However, you develop a dislike for the food and feel nauseated whenever you smell it. Classical

    10.  An individual receives frequent injections of drugs, which are administered in a small examination room at a clinic. The drug itself causes increased heart rate but after several trips to the clinic, simply being in a small room causes an increased heart rate. Classical

     

    Though I feel like I must have missed some because I didn't see any obvious examples of punishment, which always results in a behavior decreasing in liklihood, not increasing. 

  • houndlove
    3.  Your car has a red, flashing light that blinks annoyingly if you start the car without buckling the seat belt. You become less likely to start the car without buckling the seat belt. Operant -R (increase of behavior of buckling seatbelt due to something unpleasant being removed from the subject)

     

    I think this is -P because the subject's likelihood of starting the car without buckling the seatbelt is decreased.

  • 1.  Every time someone flushes a toilet in the apartment building, the shower becomes very hot and causes the person to jump back. Over time, the person begins to jump back automatically after hearing the flush, before the water temperature changes.
    +P the first time. The scalding water was punishing when first linked to the sound of flushing. Eventually, the flush is a conditioned punisher and you move out of the water stream to avoid further punishment. At some point, you don't consciously think about it, you just move when hearing a flush. This would be what has been referred to as classical conditioning, ala Pavlov's dog.

    2.  Your father gives you a credit card at the end of your first year in college because you did so well. As a result, your grades continue to get better in your second year.
    What was the original motivation to do well, sans credit card? The introduction of the card is to motivate the behavior of doing better to repeat. So, +R.


    3.  Your car has a red, flashing light that blinks annoyingly if you start the car without buckling the seat belt. You become less likely to start the car without buckling the seat belt.
    -R, buckling the belt to stop the blinking light.


    4.  A lion in a circus learns to stand up on a chair and jump through a hoop to receive a food treat.
    +R, the behavior is repeated because it is rewarding.


    5.  A professor has a policy of exempting students from the final exam if they maintain perfect attendance during the quarter. His students' attendance increases dramatically.
    I was going to say +R but I think it might -R. Not skipping class results in ease of pressure by not having to take a final exam. The reward for attendance is not having to do something?


    6.  You check the coin return slot on a pay telephone and find a quarter. You find yourself checking other telephones over the next few days.
    +R, straightforward.


    7.  Your hands are cold so you put your gloves on. In the future, you are more likely to put gloves on when it's cold.
    -R, avoiding the cold.


    8.  John Watson conducted an experiment with a boy named Albert in which he paired a white rat with a loud, startling noise. Albert now becomes startled at the sight of the white rat.
    Classical, with the white rat being a conditioned punisher. Future experiences are +P.


    9.  You eat a new food and then get sick because of the flu. However, you develop a dislike for the food and feel nauseated whenever you smell it.

    This happened to me. Twice I had eaten at a fast food chain restaraunt and twice I had gotten sick, thinking it was food poisoning but it might have been something else. It was a decade before I ate there again. Classical with a conditioned +P.


    10.  An individual receives frequent injections of drugs, which are administered in a small examination room at a clinic. The drug itself causes increased heart rate but after several trips to the clinic, simply being in a small room causes an increased heart rate.

    There are many small rooms in ones life, such as a bathroom. I would more likely develope an aversion to clinics, like some people who develop an aversion to dentists' offices. OTOH, my friend Lee, who was a Navy SEAL, spent quite a bit of time planting charges in Viet Cong tunnels. He developed some claustraphobia after that. No doubt, increased heartrate and stress. He did not like attic or crawlspace work. Classical with a conditioned punisher.


     

  •  

    Sorry for the delay, Here is the answers.

    Answer either Operant or Classical.  If you decide the behavior is operant, identify which type of consequence was responsible for the behavior change (i.e., positive/negative reinforcement; positive/negative punishment). 

    [quote] 1.  Every time someone flushes a toilet in the apartment building, the shower becomes very hot and causes the person to jump back. Over time, the person begins to jump back automatically after hearing the flush, before the water temperature changes.[/quote}

    classical conditioning because jumping away from hot water is an automatic response.

    2.  Your father gives you a credit card at the end of your first year in college because you did so well. As a result, your grades continue to get better in your second year.

     

    This example is operant conditioning because school performance is a voluntary behavior.

    • The credit card is a positive reinforcement because it is given and it increases the behavior.

    3.  Your car has a red, flashing light that blinks annoyingly if you start the car without buckling the seat belt. You become less likely to start the car without buckling the seat belt.

     operant conditioning because buckling a seat belt is voluntary.

    • The flashing light is a positive punishment.
    • The consequence is given .
    • The behavior of not buckling the seat belt decreases.

    4.  A lion in a circus learns to stand up on a chair and jump through a hoop to receive a food treat.

     

    classical conditioning because nausea is an automatic response.

    5.  A professor has a policy of exempting students from the final exam if they maintain perfect attendance during the quarter. His students' attendance increases dramatically.

     

    operant conditioning because attendance is a voluntary behavior.

    • The exemption from the final exam is a negative reinforcement because something is taken away that increases the behavior (attendance).

    6.  You check the coin return slot on a pay telephone and find a quarter. You find yourself checking other telephones over the next few days.

    operant conditioning because checking the coin return slot is a voluntary behavior.

    • The quarter would be a positive reinforcement because it was given and led to an increase in the behavior.

    7.  Your hands are cold so you put your gloves on. In the future, you are more likely to put gloves on when it's cold.

     

    operant conditioning because putting gloves on is a voluntary behavior.

    • The consequence is a negative reinforcement because the coldness is taken away and the behavior of putting on gloves increases.

    8.  John Watson conducted an experiment with a boy named Albert in which he paired a white rat with a loud, startling noise. Albert now becomes startled at the sight of the white rat.

     

    classical conditioning because a startle response is an automatic behavior.

    9.  You eat a new food and then get sick because of the flu. However, you develop a dislike for the food and feel nauseated whenever you smell it.

    classical conditioning because nausea is an automatic response.

    10.  An individual receives frequent injections of drugs, which are administered in a small examination room at a clinic. The drug itself causes increased heart rate but after several trips to the clinic, simply being in a small room causes an increased heart rate.

     

    classical conditioning because the increased heart rate is an automatic response.

     

    [/quote]