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Dinovite?

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Dinovite?
  •  A friend of mine suggested the food supplement "dinovite" for my allergy-prone pup (mainly ear-infections).  Here are the the ingredients: 

    Dinovite's all natural ingredients:

    Ground flax, kelp meal (Ascophyllum nodosum), yeast culture, ground grain sorghum, diatomaceous earth, zinc methionine complex, montmorillonite clay, yucca schidigera, dehydrated alfalfa meal , Lactobacillus acidophilus fermentation product dehydrated, Lactobacillus casei fermentation product dehydrated, Bifido bacterium bifidium fermentation product dehydrated, Streptococcus faecium fermentation product dehydrated, Aspergillus oryzae fermentation product dehydrated.  www.dinovite.com

     
    Anybody tried this stuff? Thoughts on the ingredients?  Thanks.

     

  • I wouldn't feed yeast or ground grain sorghum to a dog prone to ear infections. I've read conflicting info about whether yeast in food can contribute to yeast infections. I personally think it can't be a good thing. And grains definitely contribute to overgrowth of yeast if that's the type of ear infection that your dog is prone to. It's a shame because most of the ingredients in Dinovite look excellent. So my vote is no... hopefully someone else will have more input for you.
  •  Thanks for the reply and you've touched on one of the things that concerned me.  The ear infections are always yeast and I've had some luck with yogurt.  So I'm wondering can you feed a bacterial culture to a yeast prone dog and a yeast culture to a bacterial prone dog or does it matter? 

  • I'm glad I could be of some help. I think that it would be worse to feed yeast to a dog prone to yeast infections, but to be honest I probably wouldn't feed it to a dog prone to bacterial infections either.
  • I can't see physiologically how yeast in the GI tract would contribute to skin infections or ear infections. That would require translocation and fungal sepsis is deadly. I can't find any evidence in the form of literature that sould support such a claim so I'm not sure where that idea stems from. If that were true you wouldn't let transplant patients eat yeast but you do. I think that is just an old wives tale personally, does anyone have any further info that would support that.
  • ottoluv
    I can't see physiologically how yeast in the GI tract would contribute to skin infections or ear infections...
    Everything I've read is that certain things feed yeast- like sugar and grains. That ends up in the body the same way- eaten and then in the digestive tract.
  • Luvntzus
    ottoluv
    I can't see physiologically how yeast in the GI tract would contribute to skin infections or ear infections...
    Everything I've read is that certain things feed yeast- like sugar and grains. That ends up in the body the same way- eaten and then in the digestive tract.

     

    But you weren't saying that the sugar was causing the yeast infections that the yeast itself did from tht first post.  I dont' see how eating yeast would cause a cutaneous infections.  Yeast infections on dogs with allergies are opportunistic infections due to skin excoriation, the best way to treat is by treating the allergy/skin break down, not by changing to less carbs.  If you think that feeding carbs/grain would "feed" the yeast, which I also don't see significant evidence for, then the solution would be to eat a grain free diet.  I can't imagine that the small amount of sorgum in a vit supplement would be significat.  This seems to be a common thought, but I still am not quite sure if there is any scientific basis for it.  Just curious about where these beliefs come from.

  • Thanks for the replies.  For what it's worth, they are suggesting one tablespoon for every 10 pounds of dog, daily.  I'm not sure what percentage of the ingredients are yeast, but that does seem pretty "yeasty."  They are mainly touting the digestive enzymes and probiotic benefits of the product.  I'm just wondering if I'm getting the same basic benefit from yogurt, or if there is really any benefit at all.  

  • ottoluv
    But you weren't saying that the sugar was causing the yeast infections that the yeast itself did from tht first post.  I dont' see how eating yeast would cause a cutaneous infections.  Yeast infections on dogs with allergies are opportunistic infections due to skin excoriation, the best way to treat is by treating the allergy/skin break down, not by changing to less carbs.  If you think that feeding carbs/grain would "feed" the yeast, which I also don't see significant evidence for, then the solution would be to eat a grain free diet.  I can't imagine that the small amount of sorgum in a vit supplement would be significat.  This seems to be a common thought, but I still am not quite sure if there is any scientific basis for it.  Just curious about where these beliefs come from.
    Right, I see what you're saying. I just don't think that feeding yeast to a dog prone to yeast infections is a good idea. I definitely agree that feeding yeast can't cause a cutaneous infection. But if a dog is already prone to any type of ear infection, I wouldn't introduce something like yeast that IMO might make the problem worse.