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Two male dogs in the house...good? bad?

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Two male dogs in the house...good? bad?
  • I posted yesterday that I think I might have found one of Buddy's litter mates.  He is up for adoption and I am thinking about applying for adoption.  My mom is questioning two males in the same house.  Both are neutered.  Buddy was neutered when he was 8mo.  I have no idea when the litter mate was neutered. 
    If they were to live in the same house, in general, would there be constant competition for rank and would they mark around the house?  I know that so much depends on personality, how well they get along and the age at which they were neutered.  But, please give me some generalities and your own experience.

    Sue
  • From what I've read, opposite sex pairings are the best, two neutered males are a close runner-up, and two females is asking for trouble, especially if they are unaltered.
  • I have 3 neutered males, 2 unneutered males, and a spayed female. 2 of my neutered males or breeds that are generally majorly dog aggressive and they still all get along fine. My spayed female actually causes 90% of the disagreements, in fact. It depends on the dogs, but I've had the best luck introducing neutered males, myself.
  • you will probably have good luck with 2 altered males unless you introduce a female,spayed or not,into the mix..
     This is what happened to us..We have 2 altered males,and a spayed female.When the boys started coming into maturity,they both became possesive over the female,and now the boys need to be separated.

     A lot does depend on the particular dogs though..
  • ORIGINAL: MhadDog

    you will probably have good luck with 2 altered males unless you introduce a female,spayed or not,into the mix..
    This is what happened to us..We have 2 altered males,and a spayed female.When the boys started coming into maturity,they both became possesive over the female,and now the boys need to be separated.

    A lot does depend on the particular dogs though..


    Here's another situation that will come up. 
    My parents have an altered female, 6yrs.  She and Buddy are together at least 1-2 times a week.  They play okay, now.  The female wasn't around other dogs before Buddy came along and she had to learn how to play with another dog.  They do alot of chasing.  Would I be creating a volatile situation with my two boys coming over to their house?  It is quite possible that I will be living with my parents in a year, so I need to think about all possibilities.
     
    Sue
     
     
  • Personal experience:

    I have three spayed females and two neutered males. They were brought into the house, over several years, in this order:

    female 1, adult, spayed at unknown age
    female 2, puppy, spayed at six months
    male 1, puppy, neutered at six months
    male 2, adult, neutered at unknown age
    female 3, adult, spayed at unknown age

    The only problem I've had was between female 2 and male 2 - they had a bloody fight when the female was resource guarding me the second week male 2 was here. Since then, no problems, and no problems with any of the others.

    However, I did notice some changes when I introduced male 2. Male 1 hadn't ever lifted his leg to pee or marked anything. Now he lifts his leg and marks everything in the backyard, mimicking male 2 - nothing in the house though. The two males take turns marking the spots where the girls go to the bathroom. Male 2 is very dominant, but that works because male 1 doesn't care to be.

    I take the two males to play at a house where there are five spayed females that live in harmony and we don't have any problems that stem from sex. The only issues arise from male 2 being SOOOO dominant.

    So I don't put much stock into male-female, male-male, female-female myths. It's more if this particular dog and that particular dog have complimentary or clashing personalities.
  • It's more if this particular dog and that particular dog have complimentary or clashing personalities.

     
    This is exactly what I was going to add. It really is quite dependent on the individual dogs. Growing up we had many dogs of the same sex living together with no problems at all.
     
     Will they allow you to bring Buddy and see how they interact? 
  • In going from one dog to two dogs, it may be correct to consider the groupings of males vs females vs age vs S/N.  That is not my experience with a pack size of 5 or 6 where some of the members change at least 3 or 4 times a year.  I have experienced all combinations of gender, age, and S/N, and in addition breed and temperament.  I can only recall one instance where it did not work out, and that was with a SRS dog.  I am not saying that I never encounter a problem, but just that the problem gets resolved somehow.

    Anyway, I think some depends on the particular dog but a lot depends on how the dog responds to you and your handling the dog. 
  • I can't add anything about two males together, but I can comment on the female dog. My parents have four dogs, all spayed females. Max was neutered late (around 3 years old) and we have absolutely no problems, except from one of the spayed females. She always has to have her way. Max just ignores her. My $.02 is that it all depends on personality and it is so incredibly hard to gauge how they will react beforehand. Maybe try to arrange a meeting between Buddy and the other dog before you make a decision. Also, if it is a good possibility that you will be living with your parents in the near future, try to arrange a meeting with all 3 dogs on neutral ground.
  • We currently have 7 dogs.  2 females, 5 males.  Of them : 3 rotties consisting of 2 males and 1 female.  2 rat terriers, both male.  2 chis, a male and female.  All are spayed and neutered.  No problems anywhere with any of them.  And I've had tons of fosters around them with no problems. 
     
    Now, we don't have them together all the time.  The rotties like to stay in the living room with the kids and the cats.  The terriers stay in our bedroom, usually on our bed.  The chis have their bed in the bathroom as a bigger room with lots going on leaves them very skittish - afraid they'll be mushed by a 145 pound clumsy rottie is my guess!!
     
    However, they all go outside to potty together and congregate in the sitting room of our bedroom every day.  It's a really big room but they get along fine.  We've had no squabbles at all.
     
    I'd suggest taking your boy to the shelter this one is at and introducing them outside somewhere that's totally neutral, both on leashes slowly.  See how that goes.  If there's any sign of one being in instant attack mode or aggressive, I'd rethink the idea.  Maybe take a trainer with you??  I love the idea of rescue (as witnessed by my zoo at home!!) and would love to see this work!  Personally, I think chances are pretty good if the shelter boy has been well socialized. 
  • I have three neutered males in my home, and thankfully, there's been little conflict. The only problems I had in the beginning were because Tar was so young and hyper and didn't know his place in the group. Once he picked up on doggie manners and he had been put in my place once or twice by the other two, everything's been great.
     
    I really believe the dogs' personalities make a difference in how a group will get along. In my case, Brown is so laid back and loves to play, so he's happy with anytime a potential playmate comes home. Grey really doesn't care about who's in the house as long as he has his couch, bed, and food. And Tar is just everywhere all the time, and he can even get Grey to play with him so somehow, the three mesh well together.