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pomapoo

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pomapoo
  • I'm not looking to be "designer dog" flame bait here. I realize that pomapoo isn't a "breed", and that in actuality it's a glorified mixed breed, and what I want to know is the best way to care for this lovable little dog.


    I have a friend that's offered to give me a pomapoo, that was given to them, so there's no need to spew "puppy mill", or "just go to find a dog at the shelter" here. We're recycling so to speak.

    I'd like more information before I jump into ownership. I realize that traits can vary between those of pomeranians and poodles, but am hoping that other owners can offer information about their experiences in ownership and care. It would be good to know at least basic things to expect, and diet, grooming needs, etc..

    The dog is male, good natured and seems quite healthy, playful and happy, and is trained, he has long wavy hair, and a shorter/flatter snout, and curled tail. I don't know what else to add, or much about these breeds individually, or as a mix, but I do hope to learn more.

    Thanks
  • Is there a problem with the dog that they're giving him up? that'd be my first question....lol not that it'd dissuade me...but it's more that I like to be informed beforehand.
     
    If he has a shortened foreface...not common to Poms or Poodles BTW...that'd mean you'd need to use care in heat and exercise. If has long hair..that'd mean grooming daily or a nice easy to manage clip.
     
    Small dogs can have issues with slipped knees, collapsing trachea, teeth alignment, and tartar accumulation...some things you might look into to know the signs of.
     
    Some..not all...some small dogs can be resource guarding to a point, some can be finicky eaters, esp if they've been overly indulged...same with dog t dog relations...some can overreact or overdo it due to being conditioned by their owner to freak out at the approach of a larger dog.
     
    Hope that helps a bit?
  • I assume this is a small dog, so for training ideas see:
     
    Wood, Deborah
    [font=verdana][size=3], Little Dogs: Training Your Pint-Sized Companion, 5/2004
    [linkhttp://tinyurl.com/6ffqd]http://tinyurl.com/6ffqd[/link][/size][/font]
  • There aren't any problems that I'm aware of, they have 3 other dogs, (a shih tzu, another medium sized dog and a 1 year old St. Bernard), and it's too much for them. They got the dog from someone she works with, I don't know the details as to why. The dog seems healthy, happy, and well behaved.

    His face reminds me of their shih tzu (as does the long wavy hair, energy and playfulness), maybe short/flat isn't accurate, but it's not as pronounced as a poodle or pomeranian, it's hard to get a good idea since his hair is pretty long right now. I'd like to find resources on how to groom him myself since I'm on a fixed income.

    He's not spoiled if that's what you mean by overindulged, just one of 4 dogs, they all share one large crate and happily go in it together of their own accord, they also eat the same food, no special treatment.

    Could you point me to resources on what to look for as far as small dog health conditions?


    Thank you
  • Lots of Poms have short, little faces.

    Grooming is not as easy as it looks/sounds. You're working with a moving target, and sharp instruments. It's something that takes a lot of patience, and is a skill that takes a good big of time to learn. If you're willing to learn it, though, and invest the money in good equipment, it can be worthwhile to do yourself. Personally, I love grooming, and find it completely relaxing, if the dog I'm working on is cooperative.

    Poms and Poodles are both very prone to luxating patellas. I'd look at both breeds' parent clubs' websites, and see what issues the two breeds are prone to.
  • Short yes..."reminding me of a shih tzu"?? no...lol.
  • Could you point me to resources on what to look for as far as small dog health conditions?

    Canine Inherited Disorders Database

    [linkhttp://www.upei.ca/~cidd/intro.htm]http://www.upei.ca/~cidd/intro.htm[/link]
     
    [color=#000000][size=3]Genetic Diseases and Problems That Run in Breeds

    [linkhttp://www.raot.org/information/genetic.htm]http://www.raot.org/information/genetic.htm[/link][/size][/color]
  • Thank you for the resources.

    @rwbeagles
    When I look at the pomapoo and their shih tzu they have a lot of similarity, maybe it's because of the hair on their faces? Maybe I'm confusing snout lengths, it's not flat like a pug, is that what's considered "short"? Maybe medium is closer? Like I said, it's not as pronounced as a poodle, I was just looking at photos of pomeranians, and it's definitely closer to pomeranian length. I was thinking that was short, and didn't connect "short" with "flat", sorry for any confusion.

    I've never had to think about these things before, we always had large dogs that were easily recognized, and it's been awhile since I've owned a one, so I want to do things as right as I can.

    I appreciate all the help, and look forward to more.


    Thanks
  • I may be mistaken but I can't help getting the feeling that there is a conspiracy amongst breeders of purebred dogs[;)].  Whenever there is talk of a crossbred pup there are always an influx of people who get on their soap box and start preaching about all the so-called "hereditary" faults and yet when a purebred becomes available there doesn't seem to be such a furore. 
     
    Mynamehere - the coat of a pom x poodle is more than likely a wavy coat so it isn't as high maintenance as a purebred poodle,  brushing with a slicker brush every other day ensuring that you are brushing the undercoat and not just merely going over the surface of the coat ensures that the pup remains tangle free.  Knowing the temperament of a pom and a toy poodle you are likely to find that the pup will be a playful, affectionate, semi-active dog....I think you will be thrilled with him...I'd love to see a photo of him eventually.
     
    Don't be put off by all the hereditary problems, the thing to watch out for is luxating patellas which is basically 'dislocating kneepads'...it isn't serious in all cases...I had a chihuahua that lived to the ripe old age of 17 yo and she had that problem on both hind legs but the problem didn't phase her and she still managed to get around without a problem although I don't think she would have been too happy to run a marathon, lol. 
  • Whenever there is talk of a crossbred pup there are always an influx of people who get on their soap box and start preaching about all the so-called "hereditary" faults and yet when a purebred becomes available there doesn't seem to be such a furore.


    I'll respectfully disagree - poorly-bred purebreds are also subject to hereditary defects, and if you check out any of the threads talking about "BYBs" you'll see plenty of people on soap boxes about purebreds. [;)]

    How old is the pomapoo? Are the other dogs all in good health, well cared for, etc.? He sounds cute.

    For grooming, nail clipping is probably one of the trickier things to learn, depending how accepting he is of it. There's a thread on "grinding" nails in the grooming section that might be helpful. Otherwise, if he doesn't need clipping or anything, keeping him well groomed should be pretty simple if you brush him frequently.
  • I may be mistaken but I can't help getting the feeling that there is a conspiracy amongst breeders of purebred dogs[;)].  Whenever there is talk of a crossbred pup there are always an influx of people who get on their soap box and start preaching about all the so-called "hereditary" faults and yet when a purebred becomes available there doesn't seem to be such a furore.
     

     
    Moderator here,
    Zoretta...you are well about a mille off base. Health issues are discussed whenever anyone is getting a dog of any breed. So not sure even where that comes from. Please be respectful in your postings...your tone is edging toward derisive in this post.
  • Good for you for helping this dog by giving him a home and for getting ready by asking questions. 
    I wish I could help but I have never groomed a small dog.  Does your friend that you are getting him from groom him?  If so maybe she can help teach you how or at least give you an idea of how he responds to grooming.
    When do you get to bring the dog home?
  • I dont know much about small dogs, but I am a huge Dremel convert for nail trimming.  I was never able to do it with the clippers on my last dog, but have successfully dremeled Daisy's nails this time.  With our long haired cat, we get him shaved about every 3 months to cut down on the grooming costs.  I am sure you can do the same with a long haired dog.  With lots of brushing in between to prevent mats. 
  • how old is he?  with little dogs I would worry more about temperament and "prior extensive spoiling" than about genetic diseases.  He sounds wonderful. Get a vet checkup before you say "yes" for sure, and post a pic!
  • You are taking an unwanted dog & giving it a home. I see no reason for anyone to “flame” you. Good luck with your pup & please post pictures!