Quick Post

Does Anyone Have A List Of The Healthiest Dog Breeds?

New Topic
Does Anyone Have A List Of The Healthiest Dog Breeds?
  • That's a really cool study. If I had access to PubMed I'd spend all my time reading and never emerge from my cave. [;)]

    It's really a lot to ask breeders to first measure the amunt and scent of the farts produced to determine if they're in normal range...or bordering on grounds to remove a dog or bitch from a breeding programme


    Does anyone remember the James Herriot story about the flatulent boxer and his prissy owner? And then she tried to breed him? I have to be really in the dumps for that story to fail to make me roar with laughter from beginning to end.

  • oh yeah, the farting boxer.[:D]
     
    According to that study, a minature poodle is a good bet as far as longevity goes. It doesn't talk about non-fatal health care costs. For example, it says goldens live a long time, but I know a number of people who have spent enormous sums on treating non-fatal health problems in their goldens. Usually BYB goldens, mind you.
  • ORIGINAL: robbins

    I was wondering if there is anywhere online that lists or ranks dog breeds in terms of their overall health? I am curious about which breeds have the least amount of hereditary health issues and best potential for low vet bills versus breeds that have higher amounts of health issues and are therefore more expensive to own..

    Any ideas?

    Thanks!

     
    Some of the healthiest dog breeds out there are the ones that are the hardest to own due to behavioral issues.  My breed in particular is not the breed for someone that is inexperienced with dogs.  They are fairly healthy with very few genetic issues, but that doesn't mean they won't swallow a rock, rip a pad, break a leg, have intestinal problems, have skin issues or etc... 
     
    Also, certain breeds that are inherently healthy may have certain risks that are not associated with other breeds in terms of veterinary care.  (Sensitivity to meds, or anesthesia.) And those risks may increase the cost of health care-or reduce your choices as to vets that are familiar enough with the dog to provide competent health care.
     
    There is a reason to purchase a dog from a reputable breeder, as has been said in previous posts.
  • ORIGINAL: Xerxes

    Some of the healthiest dog breeds out there are the ones that are the hardest to own due to behavioral issues.  My breed in particular is not the breed for someone that is inexperienced with dogs.  They are fairly healthy with very few genetic issues, but that doesn't mean they won't swallow a rock, rip a pad, break a leg, have intestinal problems, have skin issues or etc... 

    Also, certain breeds that are inherently healthy may have certain risks that are not associated with other breeds in terms of veterinary care.  (Sensitivity to meds, or anesthesia.) And those risks may increase the cost of health care-or reduce your choices as to vets that are familiar enough with the dog to provide competent health care.

    There is a reason to purchase a dog from a reputable breeder, as has been said in previous posts.

     
    I think it's true for any dog; the health depends largely on how the dog is cared for.  If you feed low quality food the life of your dog will be reduced greatly.  If you don't groom a dog as often as it needs it, it may end up with skin issues.  If you have a dog with a lot behavioral problems, you may pay a lot for a trainer and/or behaviorist to help you with the dogs issues.  I have seen many dogs who could have avoided being sick if the owner had only properly cared for the dog.
     
    For the most part the health of my future dog depends on how I care for the dog.  I know that a beardie requires hours of grooming, that's not just taking the dog to a groomer once a month, it's sitting down with the dog and brushing it's fur, cleaning and plucking it's ears, and a number of other things that I need to do just to own the breed. If I don't brush it, the hair will get matted and the dog will have skin issues.  Although my breed is not know to have many genetic problems, I still have to worry about how I treat the dog. I also know that they are prone to autoimmune dieses, but that#%92s the owners fault for over vaccinating the dog. 
     
     

  • ORIGINAL: robbins

    I was wondering if there is anywhere online that lists or ranks dog breeds in terms of their overall health? I am curious about which breeds have the least amount of hereditary health issues and best potential for low vet bills versus breeds that have higher amounts of health issues and are therefore more expensive to own..

    Any ideas?

    Thanks!



    Health issues is a very important consideration when picking a breed. As the replies indicate identifying the 'healthiest' breeds is contingent on many factors, the most obvious being reputable breeding. I think the more appropriate question to ask is "Does Anyone Have A List Of The UNHEALTHIEST Dogs?"
  • I really agree with what's already been said.  There are definately dogs out there that are more known for relative health....BUT a lot of that is going to be contingent on breeding practices, general health maintenence (regular vet visits) and diet/excercise. 

    For instance, the dog we are interested in the flat-coated retriever, comes from a relatively small gene pool due to the breed almost dying out.  Because of this, some health concerns are not as prevelant in the breed...and breeders of FCR usually take great pride in the lines.  However, early onset cancer is a major concern within the breed, and must be taken into consideration.  Even with careful breeding there's still a risk, so it's been one of my number one questions of breeders we are in contact with.  Then again, the breed doesn't also have as much incidence of hip dysplasia or other common ailments affecting other more popular retrieving breeds. 
  • We're gonna talk about Bostons and not mention the breathing issues?? Curious.....
  • Flatulence aside, When I las thought about this, I decided I wanted a dog that was "medium" and not overbred.

    Dogs are bred really far away from a medium set of phenotypes: about forty pounds, medium build, pointy ears, a little wolfy looking... like a Carolina dog or other "primitive" breed.

    Since I wanted a really healthy dog, I stayed away from extremes in phenotype: for example, dogs that exhibit dwarfism, are too large or too small, have smashed-in faces, etc. etc. etc...

    And then, once I got a family of dogs that are not too extreme in any direction, I tossed out the ones that are or have been very very popular (ie, labs, dalmatians, goldens) because the chances that they are going to be poorly bred somewhere in the line increases with popularity.


    Ed is right--you do wind up with a list of dogs that are not for the faint of heart, mostly sighthounds and intense sporting breeds.
  • Hey! Not all dwarfs are unhealthy. Cardis and some of the rarer dwarf terriers really are pretty damn hardy breeds!