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Pitt Mix?

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Pitt Mix?
  • Hi! I see that there are lots of threads like this in this section but if you all could humor me with another I'd appreciate it! This is Molly, she's about 2 and weighs 65ish lbs. I'm pretty sure she's a pit mix and have had most people tell me she looks like a "backyard pitt" Anyone have a clue? Here are some details of my sweet girl. She is very sweet, good with kids. Never shows any bad temper and loves other dogs though she gets a little too excited around other Pitts and more aggressive dogs. She is lazy inside, sleeping on the couch most of the time but when outside she is very playful. She runs very fast and tends to run around people almost like she's herding them. She has an almost houndish bark that she doesn't use very often. Hope that helps solve mystery, here are some pics.
  • Molly is SO cute, I love her face! I also like the little white spot on the back of her neck, heehee. I would say anything she may be mixed with is probably way back there, and just call her an American Pit Bull Terrier.

  • Ha ha, the white spot is cute, that and the "freckles" above her nose are my fave! :)
  • nice creature

  •  Creature? I believe Molly is a dog. Who, BTW is a gorgeous dog.

  • I can see American staffodshire terrier in her :) they are a little taller. I can possible see Great dane to. she loosk like my aunts great dane but smaller.

  • My best friend's dog is the spitting image of this dog, same spots, same coloring, they could be twins, her Grandson bought her's from a pet store, yeah I know.... Her dog they said was a mix of boxer and beagle.  Same temperment also.

  • Aww, she is adorable.

    The term "pit bull" is used in so many ways and has more recently been what defines a group of dogs. Some would argue it's not a breed at all but an umbrella term used to describe any dog who looks like it was used to fight in a pit or has traces of a bully breed. Other say it is it's own unique breed depending on who you talk to. It's really difficult to say with many of the pitties if they are "full blooded" or mixed with something else. The shelter where I work intakes about 60% pits or pit mixes and many other open-door shelters across the country are somewhere around the same number. Unfortunately the way they look attracts the wrong kind of people to the breed which has spoiled their reputation and has lead to their increasing numbers. Your girl looks just like some of the pits we currently have on the adoption floor right now were I work.

    Pits are terriers and as so they act like terriers, they may have a higher prey drive but in the home they are couch potatoes. Your girl sounds like everything a pit should be. They have always been know to be great family dogs and good with kids. Female pits especially have a high "nanny instinct". Their play style is different then other breeds, a bit more high stung and forward then most, so often that could lead to problems with other dogs who are not so secure. Pits really shouldn't be aggressive, that we can blame on bad breeders and bad handling. Like any breed they are not always the dog for everyone but they fit well in most lifestyles. Owning one can be a challenge, not because of the behavior but more so because you have to be ready to defend and sort out the misconceptions people have about them.
  • Thanks so much for the replies! I have done quite a bit of research and I seems to me that she definitely has the characteristics of "pit bulls" though I'm sure there are other breeds in there. Whatever she is she's the perfect dog for our family and I think I am seriously addicted to this breed! I'm looking forward to rescuing another in the next year! :)
  • lilmama
    Whatever she is she's the perfect dog for our family

    This is whats really important!  She is adorable and lucky to be with you and your family.  Thank you for rescuing!

  • With that coat color she could have a bit of herder in her -- in the face she looks just like my Socks did (boxer/pit we think) but I can promise you she'll be a great dog.

    Since she's got such a great personality, let me put a bug in your ear about getting her CGC (Canine Good Citizen certificate).  If you go to the AKC.org website you'll find the section -- many AKC events offer the test. 

    It's not difficult (10 items from walking on leash, to dealing with distractions, tolerating being brushed/handled as for grooming, a 3 minute supervised time with the owners absent, etc.).  Essentially it just is a test showing your dog has manners and is good around others.

    When you have a dog of mixed heritage, it's all too easy for an outsider to make snap (and erroneous) judgments.  The CGC doesn't 'get' you anything other than it's an excellent tool to have if you ever have an insurance company hassle you about "dangerous breeds" or even an un-friendly neighbor.  Being able to say "She's a great dog and has her CGC -- oh that??? It's the AKC certificate essentially saying she's a well-behaved, well socialized dog."

    If you ever want to do pet therapy with her it's a starting place for that as well. 

    I just always try to encourage folks with dogs of heritage that some folks may take umbrage with to have the CGC just "because".  It can solve some problems before they arise because it says "This owner CARES". 

    true story:  My Socks was also the sweetest girl.  But I had many point to her and grumble about "dangerous dogs".  She had a rough life before us and had been massively heartworm positive - so much so that the parasites damaged her heart/lungs so she coughed.  She wore a t-shirt all the time (it actually helped keep the coughing under control). 

    We were at Give Kids the World doing pet therapy one weekend, and Socks was sitting with my husband with a couple of little girls draped all over her.  Their father came up to me and said,

    "You know -- when I see a dog like that I have to admit I think 'dangerous breed mix' -- but you know what?  But a dog sitting there with a T-Shirt really doesn't look threatening."

     Yep -- beauty is in the eye of the beholder -- but it made me so aware of how impressions are influenced, but it was often just plain nice to *inform* the un-educated and/or nervous that not only was she well-socialized but the AKC had recognized it.

  • calliecritturs

    With that coat color she could have a bit of herder in her -- in the face she looks just like my Socks did (boxer/pit we think) but I can promise you she'll be a great dog.

    Since she's got such a great personality, let me put a bug in your ear about getting her CGC (Canine Good Citizen certificate).  If you go to the AKC.org website you'll find the section -- many AKC events offer the test. 

    It's not difficult (10 items from walking on leash, to dealing with distractions, tolerating being brushed/handled as for grooming, a 3 minute supervised time with the owners absent, etc.).  Essentially it just is a test showing your dog has manners and is good around others.

    When you have a dog of mixed heritage, it's all too easy for an outsider to make snap (and erroneous) judgments.  The CGC doesn't 'get' you anything other than it's an excellent tool to have if you ever have an insurance company hassle you about "dangerous breeds" or even an un-friendly neighbor.  Being able to say "She's a great dog and has her CGC -- oh that??? It's the AKC certificate essentially saying she's a well-behaved, well socialized dog."

    If you ever want to do pet therapy with her it's a starting place for that as well. 

    I just always try to encourage folks with dogs of heritage that some folks may take umbrage with to have the CGC just "because".  It can solve some problems before they arise because it says "This owner CARES". 

    true story:  My Socks was also the sweetest girl.  But I had many point to her and grumble about "dangerous dogs".  She had a rough life before us and had been massively heartworm positive - so much so that the parasites damaged her heart/lungs so she coughed.  She wore a t-shirt all the time (it actually helped keep the coughing under control). 

    We were at Give Kids the World doing pet therapy one weekend, and Socks was sitting with my husband with a couple of little girls draped all over her.  Their father came up to me and said,

    "You know -- when I see a dog like that I have to admit I think 'dangerous breed mix' -- but you know what?  But a dog sitting there with a T-Shirt really doesn't look threatening."

     Yep -- beauty is in the eye of the beholder -- but it made me so aware of how impressions are influenced, but it was often just plain nice to *inform* the un-educated and/or nervous that not only was she well-socialized but the AKC had recognized it.

    I have actually been looking into that! Molly is really so good, the only problems we have is her lunging on the leash when she sees other dogs or get's overly excited and running out the door :( I have heard that PetCo gives classes for the CGC test...has anyone taken them with their dog? Are they any good or should I go with an "obedience school"?
  • Typically classes in a "store" tend not to be a great place to concentrate (for you or the dog) -- you might want to see if your town/city has a dog club -- that can be a good source for classes, and it's not uncommon to see a preparatory class for the CGC.  A lot of times something like that is not just training, but it's also training the human to know how to take a different kind of step to *avoid* the lunging (rather than just teaching the dog 'not to' -- if that makes sense). 

    In other words, if you see a situation where you think "she's GONNA lunge" before she does you engage her attention and have her **SIT**.  In other words -- giving them a command to obey *before* they break loose makes it way easier to then keep their attention than to try to regain it after they've already run amok.  It's sort of a "steer into the skid" mentality -- rather than trying in vain to stop when you know you can't instead you try to direct her into a more easily manageable position.

    Honestly that's a lot of the type of thing you learn at good obedience classes (not just "sit" but how to think beyond what the dog is doing at this instant). 

    I have done lots of different CGC classes -- and I think they're always good.  Often they are a good starting place to evaluate what a dog really *does* need ... and also what the dog has an affinity for. 

    Good luck -- she IS a beauty!

  •  Find a clicker trainer - if she's Pit, she's a working, smart breed, and they always do well with CT.  Do NOT go to a trainer who uses shock or prong collars - if she lunges at other dogs, and you use those tools, you can inadvertantly teach her that "dogs make my neck hurt" and that can result in feelings of aggression toward other dogs.  Amazon videos on demand has the Ian Dunbar series on training adult dogs, and I have found the exercises on those tapes extremely helpful in teaching self control on leash to adolescent and adult dogs.  It puts the focus on the owner as the source of interest, not the other dogs in the area.  There are several ways to find clicker or positive trainers, but this is one: www.trulydogfriendly.com.   Also, Google "Karen Pryor Clicker Trainers" and that will pop up another source.  Petco, etc. tend to be populated by beginner trainers, and obedience clubs (not all, but most) are populated by people who may still believe in correction or dominance-based training. 

    Please read:

    http://www.pitbulls.org/article/getting-started-pit-bulls-and-clicker-training

    http://therealpitbullblog.blogspot.com/2009/04/click-bulls-rpb-is-firmly-dedicated-to.html

    http://www.avsabonline.org/avsabonline/images/stories/Position_Statements/dominance%20statement.pdf

     

  • I've set up an interview with these two....I'm in favor of the first since it seems more family oriented... http://www.jaemars.com/Obedience101.htm http://www.southernk9solutions.com/SK9S_Services.html