Quick Post

Non-drooly mastiff breeds?

New Topic
Non-drooly mastiff breeds?
  •  Is there such a thing? I've got my huggable spitz, now, which has left me with no idea, really, what would be next on my list. Not that it's urgent by any means. I really like the big mastiffs, but I really hate drool. I'd love a dog that was kinda the opposite to the Lapphund. Big and serious and protective. I've thought a lot about livestock guardians, but am a bit nervous about them. Especially with regards to the rabbits. And other dogs, as we do live in suburbia and there are a lot of dogs around. I have a total crush on Tibetan Mastiffs, but I doubt we really have enough room for such a giant. They might be relatively low activity dogs, but they still need a yard big enough to contain them and a car big enough to transport them!

     

  •  The mastiff breeds I've met have all drooled to some extent.  I'm sure there are lines out there that have dryer mouths than others, tho.

  • I was at pet smart once and met a beautiful mastiff. I went up and was talking to them, and they said that he was an "american mastiff", and told me that he had a dry mouth. Sure enough, no drool. I don't know if this is a responsibly bred dog, or how they do it, but this dog had a fantastic temperament and was gorgeous! 

  • Leo's do not drool and they are typically considered a Mastiff type. Ditto the Tibetan Mastiff. Kuvaz...Maremma..I would consider those Mastiff type and I think they have tight flews.

  •  I've read that Anatolian Shepherds don't drool.  Not sure if they're mastiff-y enough for your but certainly big.

    http://www.asdca.org/ 

  • I seriously considered Anatolians...the potential DA, alpha behavior, and guardiness put me off. They are friendly with animals and dogs they grow up with but those considered interlopers are typically dealt with most seriously. Lovely breed. If I lived in a single or couple dog household I'd certainly have obtained one...they're a ton less dollarwise to obtain here, than Leo's LMBO.

  • corvus
    I've thought a lot about livestock guardians, but am a bit nervous about them. Especially with regards to the rabbits.

     

    A properly bred LGD should have ZERO prey drive.  An LGD that can't be trusted around a vulnerable newborn lamb is worthless with regards to doing its job.  I know of Maremmas that guard the family guinea pig - your rabbits would be safe with an LGD not just because the dog won't harm them, but it's likely to prevent anything else from harming them, too.  You're used to "primitive" animals so if the rabbits are your only concern, I'd put that fear to rest.  

  • Tibetan Mastiffs are beautiful!

    A friend of mine has one. His mouth is (comparatively) dry...unless he's waiting for dinner.

  • Thirded on the Tibetan Mastiff, they are a dry mouthed breed except after drinking water, or getting excited. However they aren't "recreational" droolers. Lol! And omg corvus, you need to post way more pics of Kivi Tarro.
  •  

    RidgebackGermansShep

    I was at pet smart once and met a beautiful mastiff. I went up and was talking to them, and they said that he was an "american mastiff", and told me that he had a dry mouth. Sure enough, no drool. I don't know if this is a responsibly bred dog, or how they do it, but this dog had a fantastic temperament and was gorgeous! 


    We have a guy in class who has his third "American Mastiff".  He lost his first male to cancer, and the female to complications/infection from surgery.  Anyway- a few years ago when he told us what they were, I Googled it.  I came up with two sites about them- one saying they were the only true breeder of American Mastiffs.  I kind of got the "Labradoodle" feel from what I was reading.  What prompted me to ask about the dogs was that the male (first one they owned) look like a large Bullmastiff.  The female looked like a Bullmastiff mix.

  • Maremma.  No drool, proven as fine family dogs with proper socialization and understanding of breed, not particularly people-aggressive naturally.  Livestock guardians should be fine around rabbits.  Whatever they are assigned to guard, they guard.  Min's snotty behavior with my established LGDs keeps getting her taken to the woodshed and driven from the group, so she assigned herself to be the official duck guardians.  Now seventeen Rouen ducks and a 80 pound Maremma wander around the property together most of the day.

    They are not gigantic either and they are healthy with a long life span (about the same or better than a corgi: 14 to 17 years). 

  • corvus

     Is there such a thing? I've got my huggable spitz, now, which has left me with no idea, really, what would be next on my list. Not that it's urgent by any means. I really like the big mastiffs, but I really hate drool. I'd love a dog that was kinda the opposite to the Lapphund. Big and serious and protective. I've thought a lot about livestock guardians, but am a bit nervous about them. Especially with regards to the rabbits. And other dogs, as we do live in suburbia and there are a lot of dogs around. I have a total crush on Tibetan Mastiffs, but I doubt we really have enough room for such a giant. They might be relatively low activity dogs, but they still need a yard big enough to contain them and a car big enough to transport them!

     

     

     I'm with you I hate drool, you can own a mastiff breed without having all the slime. I chose those with less drool or dry mouth Boerboel and Cane Corso. You can expect after drinking their might be some wetness or they might make a little drool in the area of their bowl but other then that they are not really droolers. Cane Corso do have a prey drive I'd say medium and might hurt your rabbits, others might not want to chase and kill them but could accidentlly harm them slap them with their paws too hard, others would be fine with them. So it just depends on the dog. Boerboels seem to have less prey drive some very low but that doesn't mean they could be 100% trusted with a small animal.

     In regards to LGDs and rabbits that is what an LGD is for to protect livestock/family so there really isn't a reason to worry. My friends is good with her rabbits, mine is pretty much ok with my rabbits and her night duty is to protect them and the ducks/chickens. That is what they are bred to guard and protect their flock. They also lack prey drive so don't typically want to chase small critters. A LGD that will chase a rabbit instead of guarding the herd wouldn't be very useful.

    You also said you have a spitz and I know many of the spitz breeds are characterized as having some prey drive, some breeds even considered high. So I'm wondering how do they mix with your rabbits.

     Not everyone with an LGD lives on acres of land it is about being responsible, managing the dog and lots of socialization. I think you can make it work if you really want, there are different LGDs with different temperaments. Many are also pretty lazy and don't need a huge space to run. Tibetans don't just require room but have similar needs to LGDs in regards to being protective and needing lots of socialization. There are several mastiff breeds some with not much prey drive but still having the a good defense drive and territorial like an LGD, others have a prey drive and would possibly harm your rabbits, other dogs could certainly be an issue too. Some Tibetans can have the same sex aggression issues and be dominant to other dogs.

     I think you are right to look ahead and think about room though. A car big enough for the dog and others to fit comfortably is important and maybe something many people overlook.

     Here is some photos with a baby chic

     

     

     

     

  • Spicy_Bulldog

     Here is some photos with a baby chic

     

     

     

     

     

     

    OMG *dies of cuteness overload*

     

    soooo glad i got curious with this... i learned something and got to squeal and giggle like a little girl =P

  • OMG, I completely forgot about this thread until I typed "mastiffs that don't drool" into Google. Stick out tongue 

    I still have a total crush on Tibetan Mastiffs. There are a few breeders in Australia that are so focused on breeding Tibetans that can funtion like normal dogs in society I'm all the more in love with them. But still, the size of the yard bothers me. It's big enough to play fetch with the Lappie and Penny, and I feel like it's quite big enough for two medium-sized dogs that don't want to run too much. Kivi can stretch his legs fine and there's lots of garden to dig up and lie in and cool spots, but it's hard to picture whether it would be big enough for a Tibetan or something similar. The car I'm less worried about as we're planning on a station wagon in the not-to-distant future.

    Wrt the lappie with the rabbits, he'll chase them if he gets the chance and he tries to nibble on Bonnie through the cage. He would totally kill or injure her if he was given free reign with her, but not deliberately. He wants to play with her and would just be way too rough. The important thing is not whether they will hurt the rabbits or not but whether they can be in the same room as a caged rabbit and not be trying to break into the cage. That's all I ask. Kivi Tarro can be left in the same room as Bonnie in her cage for a whole night or a whole day without worrying too much. If we were going to leave him inside with the rabbit all day while we were out we'd probably move her to another room just to be on the safe side, but he's really only interested in them when we talk to them. Or if he's bored and no one else will play with him.

    How much exercise would something like a Maremma need? Do LGDs get a bit antsy if they only have a small area to patrol for the most part? One of the reasons we picked Lappies was because they don't need massive amounts of exercise. Kivi is pretty happy with a half hour or hour walk or off lead run a day. You can skip a day and he won't break out of the yard or be climbing the walls when you get home. We are pressed for time as we're generally leaving at 7:30-8am and I don't get home until 6pm and when I'm away OH doesn't get home until 8pm. Fine in the summer, but very hard in the winter.